67 Years After the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima. We Still Care.

August 6, 1945 was the date when the atomic bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on the Japanese town of Hiroshima. It was a Monday morning (around 8 a.m.). An estimated 80,000 people lost their lives directly by the bombing. The successive estimates show that more than 140,000 people lost their lives as a subsequent effect of the Little Boy.

Three days later, a second atomic bomb was dropped by the US. This time it was the city of Nagasaki that received punishment for standing up for its own country in its prayers and hopes.The “Fat Man” atomic bomb took the lives of over 70,000 people in Nagasaki including a large number of Korean workers.

I am using this message to say that we are still with the victims of the attacks, as well as all innocent people who have lost their lives during a war. It doesn’t matter if they were Iraqi, American, Russian, British or Japanese – all the innocent souls who had to leave this world to come to the other one are still being in our hearts.

The Oleander is now the official flower of Hiroshima for it was the first one to bloom after the attack.

oleander hiroshima

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7 Comments on "67 Years After the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima. We Still Care."

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Dandelion
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A friend of mine’s great grandmother is Japanese and has lived through this pain. Her eyes still get filled with tears when she tells us about it… :(

Lulubel
Guest

Love to her. We can barely imagine what she got through…

Lulubel
Guest

So many years passed and I’ve only heard of it from TV, read in books, but it still sickens me. No war deserves for us to abandon all humanity and send such threat to other human beings, robbing them their chance to live and poisoning their children and lends forever.

Thank you for the post. Love and respect to Japan.

Shounen
Guest

WOW…that was amazing.

Chan-Chan
Guest

:'(

BrutalMurder
Guest

Respect to you for posing this.

InStyleAkuma
Guest

Thank you, Shinigami-sama. This should never be forgotten.